Number of major incidents involving Boeing planes until end of 2025
Basic
20
4.3k
2025
0.7%
0
2%
1
2%
2
4%
3
11%
4
79%
5+

Time period = now until end of 2025

Major incident = any sort of emergency landing, re-routing, cabin pressure breach, or serious injury to 1+ people on board. Also includes major accidents such as crashes of course. Anything not on this list that causes the FAA to ground planes and/or open an investigation would also count.

Must be caused by a technical failure of the plane, not obviously the operator's fault (e.g. poorly maintained plane). Re-routing due to airport congestion, bad weather or medical emergencies also doesn't count.

This question was prompted by the recent incident where a boeing flight in australia momentarily lost instrumentation, causing the plane to temporarily drop, injuring dozens of passengers. That obviously counts as a major incident (ETA: but it doesn't count for this market as it's outside the time frame)

Current provisional count: 3 (possible operator errors still not excluded)

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I think that's #4?

TIL some strange etymology

The FAA said the plane went into a "Dutch roll," the name given to the combination of a yawing motion when the tail slides and the plane rocks from wingtip to wingtip — a motion said to mimic the movement of a Dutch ice skater.

@shankypanky I'm going to chalk this up to weather and not count it for this market.

Another one added to the list, pending outcomes of investigations as usual: https://www.bbc.com/news/articles/ce5ljpnggp4o

@Jwags Provisional yes under "FAA opens an investigation" criterion. ETA: also qualifies under "emergency landing" as the plane returned to the airport of origin.

@TimothyJohnson5c16 I guess not, there were no injuries.

@TimothyJohnson5c16 The question description says "Major incident = any sort of emergency landing, re-routing, cabin pressure breach, or serious injury to 1+ people on board." That's "or" injuries, not "and." Although there appears to have been no emergency landing or rerouting either.

@TimothyJohnson5c16 However the description also says "Anything not on this list that causes the FAA to ground planes and/or open an investigation would also count." While the BBC article says "The US Federal Aviation Authority (FAA) said it was investigating how the panel came apart."
So I believe that is a yes.

@HarrisonNathan I am counting this as a yes. I put the FAA clause in there as a catch-all for cases that slipped through the cracks of my other criteria. I'm not an aviation expert, so I thought this would be a good proxy for something serious happening, which it is in this case.

ETA: the only thing that would cause me to change my decision here is an investigation coming back with a clear operator error, such as skipped maintenance or something.

@TimothyJohnson5c16 But I think that's the one that you're not counting?

@TimothyJohnson5c16 correct! Current count is still 0.

btw I would appreciate crowdsourcing the resolution here. Post relevant incidents, or even better, suggest a trustworthy data source. I can't guarantee that I'll hear about every incident myself.

@VitorBosshard A good source is https://aviation-safety.net/database/, though it's not easy to filter between technical failure vs. operator error

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