Which adjectives will be used in the next State of the Union address?
165
35k
resolved Mar 8
Resolved
YES
Good
Resolved
YES
Great
Resolved
YES
Important
Resolved
YES
American
Resolved
YES
New
Resolved
YES
Safe
Resolved
NO
Steadfast
Resolved
NO
Generative
Resolved
YES
Strong
Resolved
YES
National
Resolved
YES
Significant
Resolved
YES
Small
Resolved
YES
Bipartisan
Resolved
YES
Poisonous
Resolved
YES
Clean
Resolved
NO
Surprise
Resolved
YES
Proud
Resolved
YES
Big
Resolved
YES
Other
Resolved
NO
Plumbeous

This is a free response market with unlinked answers. Anyone can submit a response, and any number of answers may resolve YES.

For an answer to resolve YES, it must be a word that is used as an adjective in the next State of the Union address delivered by the President of the United States.

A word will only resolve YES if it is used as an adjective in the speech. For example, the word 'first' will resolve YES if it is used as an adjective (e.g. "the first year of the pandemic") but it would resolve NO if it were only used in the noun 'First Lady'.

Any response that includes a word that is not used as an adjective in the address will resolve NO.

The market's close date is subject to change.

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To clarify some resolutions:

  • Biden did say 'illegal', but he used it only as a noun – therefore it resolved No

  • 'Palestinian', 'Republican', 'Houthi' and 'Israeli' were all used as adjectives at some point and thus resolved Yes

  • The word 'united' was only used in 'United States' and consequently resolved No... I understand there was confusion about compound nouns along the way, but I did provide the example of 'First Lady' not counting for 'first' right from the beginning of this market and this certainly falls in the same category

If you'd like more clarification or if you think I might've hit the wrong button while resolving – I was very careful but there is a chance that I made one mistake while resolving 100 different options – please let me know!

I based most of my resolutions on the NYT transcript of the address as given while checking some things in the copy of the address as prepared. (The latter is on the White House website and the former is linked in an earlier comment.)

This was an interesting question. Well done.

The full transcript, from NYT, of everything that got said: https://www.nytimes.com/2024/03/08/us/politics/state-of-the-union-transcript-biden.html

Like, this is the post-event full transcript — as opposed to the scripted version of the prepared remarks, which TIME and others posted. (The way you can tell is that "Snickers" gets mentioned in the full version.)

So, you can use this to check which adjectives got used!

and here's a version on Pastebin: https://pastebin.com/Km3BFqNV

@PaintspotInfez Thank you

sold Ṁ4 Plumbeous NO

Just checking — for an option like "Great": if he uses "Greater" and "Greatest" but does not use "Great", would "Great" resolve YES or NO?

@PaintspotInfez it would resolve No

Should this be closed?

@bluefrog extended for you 🥰

Threat , War

bought Ṁ10 Answer #09c5c1a6512e NO

Adding this to the new State of the Union dashboard.

Too late to add "elderly"

@MartinRandall Is it limited to 100?

@Snarflak yes, these multi choice markets are limited to 100 answers

@Snarflak no, you can technically be President at any age.

Nvm

@Alex My impression of the criterion in this market is that if an adjective is capitalized in the transcript, then it won’t count. But what about compound noun terms that aren’t capitalized like “mental health”, “nuclear energy”, and “natural disaster”.

You mentioned that “American” may resolve YES despite being capitalized, but under what circumstances, and what about terms like “Republican”, “Jewish”, and “Palestinian”?

@soweliSon I apologise for taking so long to respond; I needed time to consider your questions carefully and articulate my reasoning.

As you mentioned, I have said that I will, where necessary, take cues from the written version of the address. If the first letter of a word is capitalised when it typically wouldn't be, then yes, I think it is safe to assume that it won't count. 'Generative AI' (with a capital 'G') is clearly intended as a compound noun, whereas I have said that 'generative AI' would be sufficient to resolve 'generative' to YES as an adjective. Likewise, if two words are hyphenated to form a compound, I will take note of this, too.

Beyond this, I think it becomes murky. Countless combinations of adjective and noun could be claimed as compounds, with varying levels of justification. Where am I to draw the line? How am I to determine that an adjective is really a component of a compound noun when no stylistic choice has been made to identify it as one, and how am I to do this in a way that doesn't open the door for every combination of adjective and noun to be argued to be a compound?

Referring to a dictionary only makes this more confusing. Merriam-Webster recognises 'generative AI' as a compound noun (even with a lowercase 'g') yet it also recognises 'generative' as an adjective in the exact same context. It recognises 'mental health' as a noun, yet it also recognises 'mental' as an adjective in the phrase 'mental health'.

I believe the fairest, most logical and most easily applied rule is to consider something a compound only if it is expressly presented as one in the written version of the address. This seems consistent with what I have already said about 'generative'. I will provide some examples soon of what would or wouldn't be sufficient to resolve certain answers to YES.

@a_l_e_x The general use of an adjective is to be added to a noun (that's where the word "adjective" comes from, from the Latin "adicere", "to add to"). The distinction that you are trying to make between a "compound noun" and a general use of "noun+adjective" is arbitrary in my view ("murky" or "confusing" indeed, as you say yourself). I think you ran into trouble by coming up with the example of "First Lady" not being accepted and then having to defend that stance. But "First" in "First Lady" is as much an adjective as "first" in "my first remark" (e.g.). If you had to ask the question again, wouldn't you simply accept any "adjective use" of an adjective...?

(a real adjective use as opposed to a use as a noun, like in "the rich and the poor" or the use as an adverb like in "First and Last and Always"..., but let's not make it difficult again.. it would have been better if you had simply accepted any use of the character string "first" (e.g.) etc...

@NicoGoethals Do you have a question?

The address will be delivered on the 7th of March: https://www.npr.org/2024/01/06/1223292174/biden-state-of-the-union-march-7

So if Biden only said “We need to protect American Muslims.” it would resolve NO, but if he said “We need to protect Muslim Americans.”, it would resolve YES?

@PeanutCookieFantaCheesyPa My assumption would be NO for both because "American Muslims" and "Muslim Americans" are compound nouns, not adjectives. But it could be YES in the compound adjective sense such as "A bill for Muslim American students".

Biden is going to say "I'm eepy" before leaving the podium

Close date extended.

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