Which of these IUCN critically endangered ("Red List") species will still be extant in 2040?
14
2.7k
2040
69%
African forest elephant (Loxodonta cyclotis)
57%
Chinese pangolin (Manis pentadactyla)
95%
European hamster (Cricetus cricetus)
41%
Vaquita (Phocoena sinus)
57%
Black rhinoceros (Diceros bicornis)
45%
Sumatran orangutan (Pongo abelii)
57%
Hawksbill sea turtle (Eretmochelys imbricata)
57%
Santiago Island giant tortoise (Chelonoidis niger darwini)
86%
Torrey pine (Pinus torreyana)
57%
Jellyfish tree (Medusagyne oppositifolia)
90%
Kākāpō (Strigops habroptila)
57%
Great green macaw (Ara ambiguus)
57%
Pernambuco pygmy owl (Glaucidium mooreorum)
57%
California condor (Gymnogyps californianus)
69%
Great hammerhead (Sphyrna mokarran)
57%
Angelshark (Squatina squatina)
45%
Nike's squeaker (Arthroleptis nikeae)
69%
Ammonite Snail (Helenoconcha relicta)
57%
Dromedary naiad (Dromus dromas)
57%
Sri Lankan relict ant (Aneuretus simoni)

Extant, as in Not Extinct.

When adding to this list, please avoid Possibly Extinct ("CR(PE)") and Extinct in the Wild ("EW") species, as well as orange-status Endangered species ("EN"). They should be Critically Endangered ("CR") at time of addition, or the equivalent if the system changes.

Anything that goes extinct resolves NO, everything else resolves YES in 2040. Special cases where that doesn't apply:

  • Anything that moves to the Extinct in Wild or Possibly Extinct lists and stays there into 2040 resolves 50%

  • If a species is declared Extinct, is resolved NO, and later resurfaces, it will be unresolved if able

  • Anything that changes name or taxonomy will be updated to reflect that if possible, and may have resolution changes if necessary from mergers/ splits

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The California Condor was down to 27 individuals in the early 90s when they were all taken into captivity, declared Extinct in the Wild, and bred before eventual re-release into the wild. As of 2023, the population is estimated at 561.

David's tiger is such a rare and vulnerable type of butterfly from the Phillipines that I'm unable to find a picture of it.

Here's one of a related species:

@Primer thank you!

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The smallest elephant, the African forest elephant, is facing severe population decline from poaching and habitat loss.

this market will never make it back, seeing as it's an unlinked MC that resolves as late as 2040, but I've added 2k in subsidies because this question feels v important

@Stralor 🧡🧡🧡

tried to add a little subsidy boost and the app decided to take it twice so - lfg endangered species, you can do it 🙌

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Pattenborough market!
come for the endangered species facts, stay to make some optimistic bets about beautiful things in the world ✨

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The jellyfish tree is endemic to only a single island in the Seychelles. Once thought extinct, some individuals were found growing outside their prime habitat in the 1970s. In their current range of only 2 km from the coast, the trees are unable to germinate their seeds in the wild and must be helped by humans at botanical gardens in order to reproduce.

Chinese pangolin (Manis pentadactyla)

The famous Chinese Pangolin has been hunted so much that its population has declined by 80% in three pangolin generations (21 years). Over the past several decades, many countries have enacted protections for this creature. None more so than China, where it has been under the most threat.

Dromedary naiad (Dromus dromas)

The dromedary naiad is a freshwater mussel that was reduced to just three living specimens in the Tennessee River in 1978, and two more in the Cumberland River. Today, there are four clusters of populations, two of which are reproductive. However, from 2016-2019 there were mass die offs in one of the populations, possibly from viral infection.

endangered (not critically) so not adding the Sei Whale to this market but 😭

Kākāpō (Strigops habroptila)

The last 250 kākāpō (aka owl parrots or moss chickens), flightless birds endemic to New Zealand, have been protected by being kidnapped and sent to live on isolated islands.

Vaquita (Phocoena sinus)

There are believed to be only 30 vaquitas left in the world.

reposted

add your own! I know this question is far out, but I'd love to get some insights on it

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