Will it be possible to significantly slow atherosclerosis before 2033?
6
205
2033
49%
chance

Resolves as YES if there is a credible clinical trial that demonstrates an intervention significantly reducing the progression of atherosclerosis before January 1st 2033.

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In the context of this question, "significantly reducing the progression of atherosclerosis" must demonstrate at least two of the following criteria:

  • Reducing the CAC (Coronary Artery Calcium) score progression rate to 5% annually or lower (on average).

  • Reducing the buildup of non-calcified plaque compared to statins plus PCSK9 inhibitor therapy by a factor of at least 5 over a time period of at least 2 years.

  • Reducing the buildup of calcified plaque compared to statins plus PCSK9 inhibitor therapy by a factor of at least 5 over a time period of at least 2 years.

  • Demonstrating a statistically significant reduction in the buildup of plaque in other organs (non-heart) of the body compared to statins plus PCSK9 inhibitor therapy over a time period of at least 2 years.

The intervention can be any combination of therapies, which may include but are not limited to statins and PCSK9 inhibitors. The clinical trial must include at least 2000 adults, with no more than 70% belonging to the same ethnic group, ensuring at least 30% representation from other ethnic groups. The trial should ideally be a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled study or a meta-analysis of such studies.

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already exists, it's called calorie restriction

@JonathanRay is there a credible study that demonstrates this with a randomised controlled trial?

@JonathanRay I see there's the CALERIE trial where they report a drop in LDL, but that's about it

@RemNi you probably can't really RCT it because the vast majority of subjects won't comply with a sufficiently large calorie restriction, unless they're prisoners under duress

@JonathanRay and the latter would never be approved by an IRB

@JonathanRay I suppose adherence matters for an intervention. Statins are good because they are fairly easy to adhere to. It's definitely interesting research though

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