For cleaning glasses, is dishsoap+water worse than microfiber?
6
82
130
resolved Jan 6
Resolved as
50%

An optometrist-related friend claims that dishsoap+water will damage the coatings, and that one should use a microfiber cloth instead.

I'm getting a new pair of glasses soon; I intend to clean one lens with dishsoap+water, and the other with a microfiber cloth. Around 2024-01-01, I will:

  1. not-clean my glasses for a few days, to let them accumulate grime

  2. find a friend who doesn't know about this experiment

  3. hand them my glasses, ask them if they notice anything interesting

    • if "yes, [soap lens] looks worse": resolve YES

    • else if "yes, [microfiber lens] looks worse": resolve NO

  4. ask them if they notice any difference between the lenses

    • if "yes, [soap lens] looks worse": resolve PROB(50%) (or lower if they sound tentative)

    • else if "yes, [microfiber lens] looks worse": resolve NO

  5. ask them if they notice one lense looking worse

    • if "yes, [soap lens] looks worse": resolve PROB(20%) (or lower if they sound tentative)

    • else: resolve NO

Details about my glasses:

  • They came from Zenni Optical, with the default coatings (anti-scratch and UV protection).

  • I clean them 1-2x/wk. (So, 10-20x before this market resolves.)

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My guess is that the if there is coating damage it would cause the effect of said coating to diminish. (So more glare if anti glare is damaged, faster smudging if smudge resistance is damaged)

Neither of these things would inherently make one lens look worse. Perhaps if you were to not clean them for some amount of time before the test the latter would become noticeable, if present.

predicted NO

@Tetra Good thought! I've added "don't clean my glasses for a few days" to the experiment design.