GiftedNater avatar
Nathan Huband
closes Jan 1, 2024
Is water wet??
22%
chance

I'll resolve this once a valid argument is given in the comments

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chair avatar
chair
is predicting YES at 60%

water is made up by molecules, surrounded by and adhering to other water, that's wet.

Jotto999 avatar
Jotto 999
sold Ṁ24 of YES

Yes, and that's a common usage of the term "wet". If we felt like it, we could have a definition of "wet" that only includes other objects' effects from interacting with the water. But that's not how most people use the term, most people also refer to water itself as being "wet".

WeatherIsNiceUpHere avatar
WeatherIsNiceUpHere
is predicting NO at 59%

@GiftedNater Wetness is the ability of a liquid to adhere to the surface of a solid, so when we say that something is wet, we mean that the liquid is sticking to the surface of a material.

Since water by itself is not a material on which it can be adhered and altered by the presence of more water, it is not wet.

degtorad avatar
degtorad
is predicting YES at 59%

@WeatherIsNiceUpHere Well of course liquid water is a material to which it is automatically adhered if we aren’t considering just disjointed aggregates of ~tens of molecules (and a couple molecules of anything isn’t probably okay to call a material, so water won’t be an exception here).

degtorad avatar
degtorad
is predicting YES at 59%

@WeatherIsNiceUpHere Interestingly, sufficiently cold water ice is probably suited to be called dry. Ice of about 0°C though is undeniably wet to me, in most circumstances.

Dreamingpast avatar

@WeatherIsNiceUpHere so if you pour a bucket of water on my dry tshirt, does the tshirt not become wet, when it was not so before?

Dreamingpast avatar

@Dreamingpast Follow up: is rain wet?

WeatherIsNiceUpHere avatar
WeatherIsNiceUpHere
is predicting NO at 52%

@Dreamingpast Rain isn’t wet. It makes things wet.

Dreamingpast avatar

@WeatherIsNiceUpHere then rain carries with it some wetness that it uses to make stuff wet.

Dreamingpast avatar

@Dreamingpast what makes up rain? So that we can identify what exactly possesses the wetness

GlenTaggart avatar
Glen Taggart
bought Ṁ20 of YES

@WeatherIsNiceUpHere counterexample: if I leave a can of paint out in the rain and it gets water in it, "oh no, my paint got wet :(" is a valid negative exclamation describing the situation, despite the paint still being a liquid

degtorad avatar
degtorad
is predicting YES at 59%

Water is wet because when you touch you, your hand gets wet, like with other things that we consider being wet, or even more so than many of them.

degtorad avatar
degtorad
is predicting YES at 59%

@degtorad when you touch it*

JimHays avatar

@degtorad Lava is injured because when you touch you, your hand gets injured

degtorad avatar
degtorad
is predicting YES at 59%

@JimHays Well obviously that’s formalistic language cheating. 😉 “Wet” correlates with pretty basic chemical/physical conditions and is applicable to a wide range of things (fabrics/furs, powders/clays, well-defined surfaces) while “injured” is not (animals and their parts, maybe some other mainly macroscopic living things; other instances covered by metaphoric usage). I think there is even better argument but I can’t seem to nail it yet and this market’s comments is a good place to find it.

degtorad avatar
degtorad
is predicting YES at 59%

@JimHays And what lava definitely is is hot. I mean, in analogy to wet water, lava makes things hot. Maybe it’s even burning hot as it makes flammable things burning! 😯

JimHays avatar

@degtorad Not saying your conclusion was wrong, just that the original argument was not sufficient to make the point without further details, which you’ve been supplying above.

Boklam avatar
Boklam
is predicting NO at 57%

Well certainly if you melt dry ice you don't expect to get wet water, do you? You get dry water.

NikitaSkovoroda avatar
Nikita Skovoroda
bought Ṁ25 of YES

@Boklam when you melt dry ice, you get a lot of CO2, (and sometimes someone gets dead if that happens in a closed space).

When you melt regular, i.e. non-dry ice, you get water.

Your statement is obviously false.

https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dry_ice

NikitaSkovoroda avatar
Nikita Skovoroda
is predicting YES at 33%

@Boklam unless you call co2 "dry water", that is. Or did you mean that?

tailcalled avatar
tailcalled
bought Ṁ10 of YES

If you touch wet stuff then you often get kind of wet because some of the water on the wet stuff transfers to you. If you touch water then you also often get kind of wet because some of the water on the water transfers to you. Therefore water is wet.

XComhghall avatar

On the other hand, burnt things can't burn you, so fire is not burnt, but water is wet, as in 'consisting of, covered with, or saturated with water or another liquid'.

Yev avatar

Let's start with a simple fact we can all agree on: water is wed.

It is wed by that guy in the foreground. And also they are both wed by the guy in the background (but the background guy is not wed, go figure). But neither of them wets water. In fact, no one wets it. In other words, water is not wet by anyone.

kazoo avatar

@Yev Not by law they not!

Yev avatar

@kazoo That's true. Their marriage is not legally recognized (in part due to being 'shopped).

But to disprove my argument you'd need to find someone who (or something that) wets water.

kazoo avatar
Trent Yazzo
is predicting NO at 46%

@Yev It is getting me wet just thinking about it. Sweating for it!

Yev avatar

@kazoo So you are being wet by your sweat. We still don't have any examples of water being wet by something or someone.

XComhghall avatar

The wetness of water is thought to be due to its high moisture content.

— Dr. Jason A. Rush, Department of Mathematics, Edinburgh University

WilliamDAlessandro avatar

Manifold discovers the hard problem and the explanatory gap!

Helamanincorporated avatar
Helaman incorporated
is predicting YES at 91%

When @TJH figures out that water is wet

DesTiny avatar
DesTiny
is predicting NO at 91%

@Helamanincorporated couze hes a gon

DesTiny avatar
DesTiny
is predicting NO at 91%
PrinceJoJo avatar
PrinceJoJo
is predicting YES at 91%
DesTiny avatar
DesTiny
is predicting NO at 91%

Obama is a deepfake

Helamanincorporated avatar
Helaman incorporated
is predicting YES at 91%

@DesTiny there is gonna be an accident if you don't delete this bro

PrinceJoJo avatar
PrinceJoJo
is predicting YES at 91%
Helamanincorporated avatar
Helaman incorporated
is predicting YES at 91%
Helamanincorporated avatar
Helaman incorporated
is predicting YES at 91%
DesTiny avatar
DesTiny
is predicting NO at 91%
PrinceJoJo avatar
PrinceJoJo
is predicting YES at 91%

@DesTiny he ain't bro look

Helamanincorporated avatar
Helaman incorporated
is predicting YES at 91%

@DesTiny bro I swear on your dad's life it happened

DesTiny avatar
DesTiny
bought Ṁ10 of NO

nah that shit aint wet. what is fire burnt? nah, water can make things wet, fire can make things burnt.

Helamanincorporated avatar
Helaman incorporated
is predicting YES at 91%

@DesTiny L take plus you have your discord username in your profile 🤢

PrinceJoJo avatar
PrinceJoJo
is predicting YES at 91%

@DesTiny no homes will add you on discord

DesTiny avatar
DesTiny
is predicting NO at 91%
PrinceJoJo avatar
PrinceJoJo
is predicting YES at 91%
PrinceJoJo avatar
PrinceJoJo
is predicting YES at 91%

@DesTiny you're fighting a losing battle here homes I spent 6.50 that could have went to a charity on this

DesTiny avatar
DesTiny
is predicting NO at 91%

@PrinceJoJo actual chad

PrinceJoJo avatar
PrinceJoJo
is predicting YES at 91%

@DesTiny it's not too late switch over water is wet

PrinceJoJo avatar
PrinceJoJo
is predicting YES at 91%

@DesTiny embrace masculinity

DesTiny avatar
DesTiny
is predicting NO at 91%

@PrinceJoJo femboy?

TJH avatar
Tommy gun
is predicting NO at 70%

@DesTiny Soooo true

Yev avatar

@DesTiny fire makes things hot and is hot. water makes things wet and is wet.

PrinceJoJo avatar
PrinceJoJo
bought Ṁ100 of YES

Water molecules touch each other. real men say Water is wet

firstuserhere avatar
firstuserhere
is predicting YES at 49%

@PrinceJoJo water molecules touching each other makes me feel weird lol

firstuserhere avatar
firstuserhere
is predicting YES at 49%

@firstuserhere thinking of water molecules touching each other*

Helamanincorporated avatar
Helaman incorporated
bought Ṁ100 of YES

@firstuserhere 💦🙏💦

PrinceJoJo avatar
PrinceJoJo
bought Ṁ4 of YES

@firstuserhere 🌊🌊🌊👔🌊🌊🌊

Real men know

PrinceJoJo avatar
PrinceJoJo
is predicting YES at 91%
Helamanincorporated avatar
Helaman incorporated
is predicting YES at 91%

@PrinceJoJo he told me water is wet

DesTiny avatar
DesTiny
bought Ṁ10 of NO

@Helamanincorporated obamna would never say such a thing

Helamanincorporated avatar
Helaman incorporated
bought Ṁ100 of YES

The use of the term wet as a noun is: liquid that makes something damp.

firstuserhere avatar
firstuserhere
is predicting YES at 91%

@Helamanincorporated if i take a dry tshirt with no wetness whatsoever and put water on it, and the tshirt becomes wet, can we say that it is the water which brought the "wetness" to the combined object of tshirt+water? @TJH

TJH avatar
Tommy gun
bought Ṁ20 of NO

@firstuserhere Yes, however you’re COMPLETELY missing the point of the no argument, in-fact I used a synonymous example in my own. Water is what creates wetness, all things that are wet can be dried, therefore if we removed the wetness from water it would simply cease to exist. Water CANNOT be wet.

firstuserhere avatar
firstuserhere
bought Ṁ10 of YES

We can start some vorticity in a lake with a paddle. So, water is not dry.

Water is a fluid - a fluid cannot maintain a shear stress for any length of time. If a shear is applied to a fluid, it will move under the shear. Thicker liquids like honey move less easily than fluids like air or water. The measure of the ease with which a fluid yields is its viscosity. So, whether water is wet or not depends on whether there indeed is an effect of viscosity in water.

Take a cylindrical tank with a hole at the center of the bottom, plugged in like a drain. If you put your hand in the water and give it some circulation, pull it out, and then pull the plug, the rotation soon dies down because of viscosity and the flow becomes irrotational—although still with some circulation around the hole.

If water had no viscosity, then the flow would not die down. A dry water theory leaves out the viscous forces and we can see that viscous forces do indeed exist in water! After all, we can start some vorticity in a lake with a paddle. So, water is wet.

TJH avatar
Tommy gun
is predicting NO at 42%

@firstuserhere Forgive me, how does this prove water is wet?

firstuserhere avatar
firstuserhere
is predicting YES at 42%

@TJH if water were dry, it wouldn't show the viscosity effect that it does indeed show in nature

firstuserhere avatar
firstuserhere
is predicting YES at 42%

@TJH if water were dry, then the rate at which it is circulating when the drain plug is pulled would not change, but it does, because of viscous forces, which don't occur in dry fluids

TJH avatar
Tommy gun
is predicting NO at 42%

@firstuserhere Sure, a body of water behaves in that way, but what is making water itself wet?

TJH avatar
Tommy gun
is predicting NO at 42%

@firstuserhere My issue with this argument is that the term “wet” and “dry” liquids are utilized to describe a fluids viscous properties, not to determine it’s wetness.

firstuserhere avatar
firstuserhere
is predicting YES at 49%

@TJH what do you mean by this "wetness" thing?

Grant22 avatar

Put your hand in water and pull your hand out. It is wet. Put your hand on the wall. The wall is now wet. Put your hand back into the same water it came from, and the the water is not any more wet than it was before. You can not make water more wet, you cannot make water any less wet. With that being said I believe that water can only act upon other bodies not effecting itself. Concluding, water is not wet.

NikitaSkovoroda avatar
Nikita Skovoroda
is predicting YES at 58%
TJH avatar
Tommy gun
bought Ṁ50 of NO

@NikitaSkovoroda This would imply a body of water would be wet, this question is referring to water itself

Helamanincorporated avatar
Helaman incorporated
is predicting YES at 42%

@TJH a body of water is still water and if a body of water is wet therefore it is logical that water is wet

XComhghall avatar

@TJH Do I not consist of myself? Does my body not include itself? Is not a set the subset of itself?

TylerHuband2834 avatar
Tyler Huband
bought Ṁ10 of NO

My biggest argument for "no" is that everyone saying "yes" has cited the intellectual property of others, whereas those arguing "no" have been able to produce their own arguments.

NikitaSkovoroda avatar
Nikita Skovoroda
bought Ṁ12 of YES

@TylerHuband2834 meaning that actually no one else agrees with that and they have to invent some elaborative weid arguments

NikitaSkovoroda avatar
Nikita Skovoroda
is predicting YES at 58%
TylerHuband2834 avatar
Tyler Huband
is predicting NO at 58%

@NikitaSkovoroda what makes the citations not "elaborative" and "weird"? For example, George Orwell is an author whose most popular work (1984) is identified as science FICTON, dystopian FICTION, political FICTION. What makes his statement inherently valid just because it is well known?

Helamanincorporated avatar
Helaman incorporated
is predicting YES at 91%

@TylerHuband2834 "Moisture is the essence of wetness, and wetness is the essence of beauty." - Derek Zoolander

NikitaSkovoroda avatar
Nikita Skovoroda
bought Ṁ14 of YES
Him avatar

The crux of this question is to define wetness. There are a couple of different ways to do this, including “how much a material can absorb liquids,” “to cover with a liquid,” “a liquid that makes something damp,” “involving the use of water,” or “the ability of a liquid to adhere to a solid.”

I think the easiest way to organize these definitions is by how broad these definitions are in terms of necessary elements. The most permissive definitions simply require a quantity of liquid greater than 1 atom, while the least permissive require both a quantity of a liquid as well as another solid.

The other benefit of organizing everything in this way is that it convinces me that wetness, by definition, requires reference of at least a molecule of liquid to something else. Wetness is not possible with a single molecule of water on/involving nothing else.

What does this imply? It implies, at least in my mind, that water itself is not wet. Sure, by some definitions a cup or drop of water might be wet - since something, water in this case, has a liquid on it - but water itself does not on its own have the property of being wet.

Duncan avatar

Yes. The ocean is wet, a river is wet, a puddle is wet, and the stream coming out of your faucet is wet. If you were to explain to a child that "actually, the ocean is not wet at all!", you would be misleading them, rather badly, both as to the nature of oceans and the nature of our usage of the word 'wet'. While some words change dramatically depending on context, wet is not generally considered one of these; a physicist or engineer might well have specialized terms (e.g., 'wet' as in 'oil-wet'), but unless you specifically specify that you are speaking in a specialized context, water is, in English, in common usage, and for the purposes of spurious prediction markets most especially, wet.

TJH avatar
Tommy gun
bought Ṁ50 of NO

@NathanHuband More arguments for no, when something is wet, it can be dried, removing the “wetness”. If you poured water on a table, it would be wet, however it could be dried with a towel. When we apply this to water, we see that it cannot be wet, if we removed the “wet” it would cease to exist.

degtorad avatar
degtorad
is predicting YES at 59%

@TJH Water can be dried, it’ll just become vapor (for example). Also I think it’s not essential for wetness to be able to be dried. There are many qualities that lack this in their concept.

Helamanincorporated avatar
Helaman incorporated
bought Ṁ20 of YES

"Truisms are true, hold onto that! The solid world exists, it's laws do not change. Stones are hard, Water is wet, objects unsupported fall to the earth center" -George Orwell 1984

TJH avatar
Tommy gun
is predicting NO at 65%

@Helamanincorporated Animal farm is pretty good but what does he know about water??

Helamanincorporated avatar
Helaman incorporated
bought Ṁ100 of YES

@Helamanincorporated he took sips from it everyday 🗿

JimHays avatar

@Helamanincorporated Objects unsupported don’t necessarily fall to the earth’s center. You need to be in Earth’s gravity well

Helamanincorporated avatar
Helaman incorporated
bought Ṁ10 of YES

Water is wet plus ratio

TJH avatar
Tommy gun
bought Ṁ65 of NO

Water is not wet because wetness is a property of a surface. When we say something is wet, it means that it has come into contact with a liquid and has absorbed some of it. Water is the liquid that creates the wetness, not the substance that is wet.

GiftedNater avatar

@TJH You’re the current leader

Helamanincorporated avatar
Helaman incorporated
is predicting YES at 42%

@TJH Water is wet, in the sense of being a liquid which flows easily, because its viscosity is low, which is because its molecules are rather loosely joined together. The sensation of wetness is largely due to the cooling caused by evaporation, and water has a rather high latent heat of vaporisation, which is the amount of heat it removes from its surroundings in order to convert liquid water into water vapour.

-John Geake

TJH avatar
Tommy gun
is predicting NO at 65%

@Helamanincorporated Come up with your own argument bum

Helamanincorporated avatar
Helaman incorporated
is predicting YES at 36%

@TJH 🌊=wet